Technicolor SA has closed down its Glendale film lab, the last one the entertainment services company was operating in North America.

The lab was shuttered Friday due to less demand for film prints as the entertainment industry continues its transition to digital distribution in movie theaters and the home. The Glendale lab had been processing large-format 65mm and 70mm prints used in IMAX theaters, said Claude Gagnon, president of creative services at Technicolor, based in Paris.

About 39 employees are in danger of losing their jobs at the Glendale location, with the company working on reassigning them elsewhere, Gagnon said. Those employees were transferred to Glendale after Technicolor closed its North Hollywood film lab in 2011.

The Glendale location was never meant to be a long-term investment but its closing was quicker than anticipated, Gagnon said. “There was no option for us to continue developing clients at the tail end of that (large-format film print) product,” he said.

The last Technicolor film lab is in Thailand serving the Southeast Asian market but even that one could be closed in a year or two, Gagnon said.

Technicolor remains active in the entertainment industry in visual effects, color correction, delivering digital files of feature films through satellite and hard drives, and supplying digital prints streamed by Netflix, iTunes and Amazon.

It has offices in Burbank, Hollywood and around the world.

Technicolor dates back to the earliest days of the film industry and is famous for its process developing color prints. In 2000, it was acquired by Thomson SA, a French company that in 2010 changed its name to Technicolor SA.