85.7 F
San Fernando
Tuesday, Aug 9, 2022
-Advertisement-

Battery Test Powers BioSolar Share Price Higher

BioSolar Inc. of Santa Clarita recently completed laboratory tests for a material that could revolutionize the market for lithium-ion batteries, a power source for rechargeable electronics such as cellphones, medical devices and even automobiles. The research and development company focused on environmentally friendly materials announced the news April 5, stating that the next step is finding potential manufacturing partners to commercialize the technology. As a result, its stock price jumped as high as 125 percent on the over-the-counter market. Shares closed at 6 cents on April 26. “The lithium-ion battery is the battery everyone will rely on for the next 10 years or more,” Dr. David Lee, BioSolar’s chief executive, said. “The goal of the lithium-ion industry is to increase capacity and lower cost, but at the same time try to make them (batteries) safer.” Batteries consist of three major components. The electrolyte is the liquid solution, such as lithium, that moves between the other two components – the negative terminal, or cathode, and the positive terminal called the anode. BioSolar’s technology focuses on the positive end of the battery as it has created a silicon anode material, which data suggests could achieve higher capacity while reducing cost. Typically, anodes for lithium-ion batteries are made of graphite, which has its limitations. Steven Risser, research leader of advanced materials at nonprofit research and development organization Battelle in Columbus, Ohio, said with graphite, the lithium goes between the layered material, restricting the amount of lithium that accumulates. “Silicon is much more of a true three-dimensional crystal, so lithium has more spots it can go to in silicon, which is why it has a higher capacity,” he added. However, the biggest challenge with silicon, Risser said, is that lithium can cause the material to swell, which can damage the anode, leading to capacity loss and ultimately shortening the battery’s lifecycle. “The battery gets weaker every time its charged and discharged,” he explained. Since the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 catastrophe, when cellphones exploded due to defective lithium-ion battery packs, safety has become a major industry concern in electronics manufacturing. BioSolar’s Lee said battery safety is most related to “proper execution of all known protocols as well as basic design materials,” meaning the electrolyte, cathode and anode must be precisely assembled with compatible materials. “We like to be involved in the whole design process; that’s why we need partners,” he added. If all goes according to plan, Lee said the company’s silicon alloy anode material could go to market in 24 months, depending on which manufacturers are selected and how the technology is applied. For example, if BioSolar’s anode material ends up as part of a battery for an electric vehicle, it could take four or five years for commercialized cars to contain them. The auto market has a longer incubation period compared to consumer electronics, which Lee said, often takes about a year to bring a concept to customers. “Right now, 99 percent of our effort is on this material,” he said. “We are looking at all possibilities.”

-Advertisement-

Featured Articles

-Advertisement-
-Advertisement-

Related Articles

-Advertisement-
-Advertisement-